Comments for http://www.wordsfromtheherd.com There's nothing like a cow. Sun, 03 Apr 2016 17:30:19 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 Comment on An Important Website about Cow Abductions by Tyler Tork http://www.wordsfromtheherd.com/an-important-website-about-cow-abductions/#comment-107410 Sun, 03 Apr 2016 17:30:19 +0000 http://www.wordsfromtheherd.com/?p=935#comment-107410 I suggest you consult some experienced cattle farmers in your area. They probably have already considered this problem and have measures in place, and they can also help you with your terminology (e.g. herd vs. flock).

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Comment on An Important Website about Cow Abductions by Noodle Dunn http://www.wordsfromtheherd.com/an-important-website-about-cow-abductions/#comment-107404 Sun, 03 Apr 2016 01:59:45 +0000 http://www.wordsfromtheherd.com/?p=935#comment-107404 Omg please send me more info. I need to protect my flock of cows.

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Comment on Connection As Currency by Conrad Zero http://www.wordsfromtheherd.com/connection-as-currency/#comment-93012 Wed, 08 Jul 2015 19:18:25 +0000 http://www.wordsfromtheherd.com/?p=1194#comment-93012 Thanks much for discussing this post in your podcast! I like your idea of croudsourcing a book about how to flirt with potential fans. If you do, I want a copy!

Yours Darkly,
-Zero

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Comment on Connection As Currency by Episode 66 – Scribd, Flip-Outs, and Indie Reviews | Sell More Books Show http://www.wordsfromtheherd.com/connection-as-currency/#comment-93009 Wed, 08 Jul 2015 18:06:26 +0000 http://www.wordsfromtheherd.com/?p=1194#comment-93009 […] Flirty Fanbase […]

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Comment on Connection As Currency by Reflections on 4th Street Fantasy Convention 2015 - Conrad Zero http://www.wordsfromtheherd.com/connection-as-currency/#comment-92833 Mon, 06 Jul 2015 16:00:35 +0000 http://www.wordsfromtheherd.com/?p=1194#comment-92833 […] But almost everyone who attends 4th street is a writer, so opportunities abound for discussions with people going through the same challenges you are. Some of the best discussions I had last weekend were expanding on the panel discussions in post-panel, ad hoc groups. I saw a lot of new faces this year and spoke with at least a dozen people I’d never met before. I made plenty of new connections. (Check out my related article over on wordsfromtheherd.com: Connection As Currency.) […]

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Comment on Speaking of New Adult Fiction… by Conrad Zero http://www.wordsfromtheherd.com/speaking-of-new-adult-fiction/#comment-52187 Thu, 03 Jul 2014 17:25:21 +0000 http://www.wordsfromtheherd.com/?p=1138#comment-52187 From a reader perspective, I like things that help me find more of what I would like to read and less of what I don’t. Genres don’t really help you do that anymore. I was disappointed to discover that the “Young Adult” genre doesn’t mean that it is intended or suitable for young adults, only that it contains a young adult protagonist. Otherwise, YA is a simple rebranding of all other book genres you already knew about. Worse, it now pulls a bunch of stuff together that used to be separated. I’m sure “New Adult” is more of the same. Some people probably feel that way about the Speculative Fiction genre pulling together Sci-Fi, Fantasy and Horror.

I’ve a feeling that genres now mean more to marketing and sales people than to readers. It seems to me that a rating system clearly labeled for the intended age group, and then tags for specific items (Horror, Crude Language, Sexual Situations, Drug Use, etc) would be a better method of classification. Kinda like the way movies do it with PG ratings.

-Z

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Comment on Speaking of New Adult Fiction… by Patrick Sullivan http://www.wordsfromtheherd.com/speaking-of-new-adult-fiction/#comment-51932 Thu, 03 Jul 2014 02:32:32 +0000 http://www.wordsfromtheherd.com/?p=1138#comment-51932 I’ve been traveling a bunch and didn’t get a chance to reply, until now. The whole genre-categorizing question is aggravating, but understandable. I don’t expect brick and mortar retailers to slice much more finely than they do, and I don’t trust the deep sub-categories the on-line retailers use. Goodreads? Other review sites?

What is it that you found satisfying about the read? I know you described various things the author did well, but you didn’t really say anything about plot/story. Was it the psychological thriller itself that kept you hooked–with a satisfying conclusion?

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Comment on Believability and the Reader’s Representative by Jess http://www.wordsfromtheherd.com/readers-representative/#comment-49676 Fri, 27 Jun 2014 17:41:23 +0000 http://www.wordsfromtheherd.com/?p=1135#comment-49676 I can’t agree more: research, research, research. I figure I do about two hours of research for every hour of first-draft writing. That way when I put the lampshade on my head, I’m still wearing pants. My current effort is SF, and as a non-scientist, I spend a LOT of time determining how things work, doing a lot of tedious math, etc. But if a reader wants to doubt my figures (such as how long it takes a falling object to reach terminal velocity when falling from and exo-atmospheric craft, depending on the atmospheric density and the shape and density of the falling object) let them give it a try. One recent such problem, falling under category three, is the very here-and-now yet practically unbelievable capabilities of a scramjet-powered aircraft. (In case you’re wondering: it can conceivably be dropped from an orbiting vessel and reach ignition airspeed without any fuel assist, so that it doesn’t need ANY fuel on board, and can then circumnavigate the Earth in about forty minutes. Is that cool, or what?) Just because I’m not a scientist doesn’t mean I can’t love science!

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Comment on Believability and the Reader’s Representative by Patrick Sullivan http://www.wordsfromtheherd.com/readers-representative/#comment-47982 Tue, 24 Jun 2014 01:33:05 +0000 http://www.wordsfromtheherd.com/?p=1135#comment-47982 Thanks for the thoughtful post, Tyler. I think you’ve presented a nice categorization of the problem of presenting things to the reader that they are quite likely to take issue with, and leave the story.

There was quite a debate around the notion of what is “right” in a given context. Several people used vampires and the “well known” vampire characteristics to indicate how “sparkly” vampires just went too far. For readers who aren’t familiar with the canon, that might not be a problem. In fact, it can start a whole new branch of the canon that is “wrong” from some other readers’ perspectives.

Do you have an opinion about going against a trope with a new “fact” or behavior that perhaps suits your story better than the standard? Would you apply one of the same three methods? It feels to me that you could use them quite nicely, even in this case.

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Comment on Believability and the Reader’s Representative by Tyler Tork http://www.wordsfromtheherd.com/readers-representative/#comment-47967 Tue, 24 Jun 2014 00:13:13 +0000 http://www.wordsfromtheherd.com/?p=1135#comment-47967 That’s interesting, but not an example of what I’m talking about. You might take that as a jumping-off point for a separate post, about ways to fill in background information. The “Penny Dreadful” example sounds like how not to do it; overly transparent.
I for one would be interested in the lengthy anecdote (though if it’s about how not to do research, it might be yet another post!)

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